My journey to Linux – Part 2

In part 2 I’ll go over the installation process as well as getting hardware accelerated full disk encryption running, using my Samsung EVO 850’s SED (Self Encrypting Drive) feature.

I ran into the common “grub-efi-amd64-signed failed to install into /target/” error message, as well as “Not authorized” when trying to encrypt my drives. Both of which I finally solved.

My journey to Linux – Part 1

Having used Windows since version 3.0 back in the DOS days, I’ve recently decided it’s time to move my workstation to Linux.

This will be the first post in a series, where I go over how the journey starts, what problems arise and (hopefully) how I solve them.

For this first post I’ll go over why, and what considerations I’ve taken before I even begin installing Linux.

C# based simple service locator

I’ve always loved the Service locator pattern – why ? Because it requires so little maintenance, and it’s a very crucial point if you want somewhat automatic dependency injection.

As you can read in my blog post “Staying DRY: Mind those switch statements” a service locator can replace cumbersome multiple switch statements which require each one to be changed whenever a new case comes along.

How to enable Windows eDrive encryption for SSDs

As you probably know a lot of SSDs are sold as SED: “Self Encrypting Device”, what this means is that the SSD can handle encryption itself, so your CPU doesn’t have to spend cycles doing it. This in turn actually means NO LOSS of performance, because the SSD is already encrypting all its content, it just doesn’t have a password set yet.

However enabling it on a desktop PC hasn’t always been easy, in fact it’s just recently with Windows 8 and the eDrive function, that it’s become somewhat simple to do.